7/17/2016

  • Final positioned truck in hangar
    • We positioned the truck in the corner of the hanger and double checked to make sure we had enough room to work around it while staying inside our pre-planned footprint. We started digging into systems today, so we consider the truck inoperable until we start reassembly.
  • Vacuumed out frame integrated tool box and battery tray
  • Removed front reflectors
  • Removed back brackets
  • Removed marker light covers
  • Removed front grill
  • Removed air intake
Vacuumed Out Frame Integrated Tool Box
Vacuumed Out Frame Integrated Tool Box
Removed Marker Light Covers
Removed Marker Light Covers
Removed Front Grill
Removed Front Grill
Removed Front Grill
Removed Front Grill
Removed Air Intake
Removed Air Intake
Removed Air Intake
Removed Air Intake

 

Air Intake Kinetic Particle Separators
Air Intake Kinetic Particle Separators

The air intake on this truck is pretty interesting. It is designed by a company named Donaldson that makes particle separator intakes for helicopters and industrial equipment. The air is sucked into the engine through a series of small vortex tubes. As the air enters the vortex tube, it is spun by the guide vanes you can see above. As the air spins, particles are flung to the outside of the tube and particle free fresh air is drawn through the middle of the tube. The particles are then vacuumed or sucked out of the assembly by a tube that you can see in the lower left side of the picture. The suction is produced by the exhaust system of the engine so the particles are mixed with exhaust and blown out of the vehicle. Supposedly, it works very well. The only downside is that it is a very big device and gets in the way of our camper plans a little bit. We removed the top of the intake assembly today and plan to modify it to reduce the overall height of that portion of the assembly. After reviewing the flow characteristics of the intake and reviewing Donaldson’s documentation, it appears that our planned modifications will have no affect on engine performance.

Keeping Track
Keeping Track

Beyond having a log book to keep track of what we do each day (so that we can post to this blog), we keep a log of tools and goods we need to bring to the hangar to work on the truck, items we need to buy, and a running to-do list so that when we are tired at the end of the day we can just go down the list and work on what we have the energy to do that day.

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3 thoughts on “7/17/2016

  1. Just started following your blog. Wish it was my project but in due time. Have you considered a used dry cargo box from a donor truck? From what I can see a 16’L x 8’W x 7’6″H box would work very well. My plan is to use the front 2′ for fresh water, tool and part storage, water pump, generator and general storage. A dry cargo box, paneled and with a linoleum floor would make it like home. I’ve considered buying a wrecked camper for the interior parts. Bunches of ideas rollin’ around upstairs. Now, if I had the truck…

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    1. Hey Jim,

      Yup, we’ve considered salvaging a box from a cargo truck. It would probably work pretty well. Pluses and minuses to everything. For us, we’re going to try to make our box a very specific size and shape to integrate as close to the cab as possible. We’re also going to try to insulate it the best we can. Overall, there is a lot of different options that would really work well for these trucks, it just depends on your budget, schedule, size, desires…

      M&Y

      Like

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